Diving watches

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To be able to dive with a watch, the watch must be able to withstand water pressure equal to 200 meters stagnant water (or 20 atmospheres /ATM/bar). To be able to swim with a watch, a water resistance of 100 meters (10 ATM/Bar) is usually sufficient enough.

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Diving Watches: History and characteristics

Diving watches are designed to be tool watches but are probably worn by more non-divers and recreational snorkelers than real scuba divers. We offer a broad range of diving watches with a wide variety of functionalities. Dive watches are ideal for people with active lifestyles. They not only look good but are also very practical.

Water resistant diving watches


Because 1 Bar is approximately equal to the pressure of 10 m stagnant water, it is also often referred to as a number of meters. 10 bar/ATM stands for 100 meters of water pressure. This does not mean that you can go swimming with a 1 bar (10 m of water pressure) water resistant watch. The watch can withstand 1 ATM of water pressure on the cabinet and crystal, but it is not fitted with sealing gaskets. For more information about water resistance, visit our information page.

History of diving watches


The history of diving watches goes back to the 19th century. Water and dust resistant watches were mostly one-off pieces tailored to a particular customer. Helmet divers of that period, often attached pocket watches on the inside of their helmets to be able to read the time under water. Since the beginning of the 20th century, dive watches have been industrially produced for the military and commercial purposes. Like their predecessors of the 19th century, these diving watches meet the needs of different but related groups: explorers, sailors and professional divers.

Dive watch characteristics

 

Watch case


The casing of a dive watch should have sufficient water (pressure) resistance and be able to withstand the corrosiveness of seawater. Therefore, the case of a diving watch is often made out of stainless steel, titanium, ceramics, carbon or synthetic resins and plastics.

Compared to dress watches made of similar materials, diving watches are relatively large and cumbersome because underwater the watch becomes virtually weightless.

Some dive watches that are intended for diving at great depths are equipped with a helium valve to prevent the cabinet and the glass dislodging by an internal pressure build-up.
 

Rotating bezel

Analog Dive watches are usually equipped with a unidirectional rotating bezel, which is used to calculate the length of a dive. Which is an important security feature allowing the diver to determine how long he can remain under water. Also, the bezel can be used in other situations where a measurement of the elapsed time of less than one hour is useful.

Digital dive watches usually measure the time by using a standard stopwatch function and are often equipped with memory functions and a depth gauge.

 

Looking to buy a dive watch? We can help you choose!

We offer a very wide range of diving watches from famous brands such as Casio, Citizen, Luminox and Orient. Dive watches are ideal for people with active lifestyles. They not only look good but are also practical with a luxurious image. The dive watches that we have selected for you on this page are 20 ATM or more waterproof. Alternatively, you can use our
search to enter your requirements.

Browse 10 ATM watches | Browse 20 ATM watches

 

Glass

Diving watches feature relatively thick (often domed) crystals to increase the pressure-resistance of the watch, and to improve visibility under water. Typical materials used for this are acrylic glass/plexiglass, hardened mineral glass and sapphire glass. Often a small magnifying glass is fitted inside the crystal above the date window (date bubble).

Crown

Analog Dive watches are fitted with a water-resistant crown. On some models, the crown is in unusual positions such as 4, 8 or 9 o’clock to prevent the crown pressing into in the back of the hand.

Often, the crown must be unscrewed to adjust the time and date. After that, the crown is tightened again to restore the water resistance of the watch and to minimise the probability of inadvertent operation under water. This is called a screwed down crown. There are also diving watches where the crown is protected by a locking lever or lid.

Watchband, strap or bracelet

Watch Bands for diving watches are usually made from materials that can withstand pressure and salt water. This means that most diving watches are fitted with a rubber, silicone rubber or polyurethane strap. A stainless steel or titanium bracelet is also common. It is important that the strap is a sufficient length to be worn on the sleeve of a diving suit. For this, the clasp on diving watches often have a (hidden) slide that can extend the bracelet by approximately 20 mm. Some rubber/silicone wristbands can be extended by an extra piece (strap extender).

Readability

The dial, indexes and bezel must be legible underwater and in low light conditions. For good readability, most dive watches have high contrasting, non-cluttered dials and markers with a large, easily recognisable minute hand. The indexes for 3, 6, 9 and (especially) 00:00 on the dial and the zero mark on the bezel of the diving watch are usually designed to be instantly recognisable. In digital diving watches, illuminated displays are used for readability in low light.

Maintenance of diving watches


Most dive watch manufacturers recommend dive watches be tested every two to five years. Seals need to be checked, and damaged gaskets replaced to maintain water resistance. Our certified watchmakers possess the specialised knowledge to carry out this work.

Also, regular maintenance by the owner is essential. Most manufacturers recommend rinsing the watch after each use with fresh water to keep the crown, bezel, buttons and pressure sensors working and free from salt deposits.